What about the JEDD? Why aren't we talking about that anymore?

There is not a JEDD on the table.

First and foremost, JEDD proposals to-date have hinged on freeing up the school property on State Route 44 for commercial development, taxing NEOMED employees at 2%, and passing much of that funding (70%) along to Rootstown LSD to fund a new school on a new site. At this time, there are no available, suitable sites in the school district to which the school could be moved. The JEDD is not a possibility or actively being discussed.

The JEDD was a township issue and therefore up to the township trustees to pass. Just like the majority of business owners and residents, the School Administration and Board did not feel they received enough information to be for or against the JEDD. In addition, the administration and board could not base the tremendously important decision of moving the school on the uncertainties that went along with the topic of the possible JEDD, as it was proposed. These uncertainties include:
•        The district and BoE would have had to base the decision on what MIGHT happen IF the township trustees were successful in their efforts to pass a JEDD SOMETIME in the future, and IF voters approved to move the school, and IF relocating the school was even possible (see major concerns with this under “School Location”).
•        While purportedly some money would be received by the school from a JEDD even if the school stayed on its current location, the “windfall” the school would potentially receive would only happen IF the school moved. This “windfall” was absolutely NOT guaranteed. (And again, see major concerns with the school being able to relocate under “School Location”.)
•        In addition, what happens if the BOE asked voters to approve moving the school based on the promise of a JEDD “windfall,” voters approved the move, and the trustees are never successful in getting a JEDD on the ballot and/or passed? The school district would then be back at square one.
•        During all this, years could pass and that could impact the amount of funding the state would supply, potentially impacting how much the local share would be

Detailed Question

What about the JEDD? Why aren't we talking about that anymore?

What happens if more money is generated from the School District Earned Income Tax?

This additional tax money can be used to pay down the bonds, i.e. the loan, on the new construction sooner.

The funds can also be diverted to school district operations, off-setting the need to ask the community for new operating levy funds.

The income tax will remain in place, no matter what, for the full 37 year duration as stipulated in the ballot issue.

Detailed Question

What happens if more money is generated from the School District Earned Income Tax? Perhaps because Rootstown's population of wage earners grows, or average incomes rise over the next couple decades?

How can I determine how much School District Income Tax I will owe?

The amount owed can be calculated by multiplying your gross taxable income times 0.0025. You can also use the SD100 form to calculate it.

http://www.tax.ohio.gov/portals/0/forms/ohio_individual/individual/2017/SDIT_SD100ES_Arrow.pdf

Detailed Question

How can I determine how much School District Income Tax I will owe?

Is the School District Income Tax the same as a city tax?

No. The SDIT and the municipal income tax differ in many ways: municipalities collect the tax from both residents and non-residents working in the municipality, but the SDIT is only on residents; municipal taxes are levied on businesses whereas the SDIT is on individuals only; the tax base for municipalities is generally earned income only, but the SDIT can be on either all sources of taxable income (i.e., the state income tax base) or just on earned income. The Rootstown one being proposed is on earned income only.

Detailed Question

Is the School District Income Tax the same as a city tax?

How does the school receive the School District Income Tax money?

The money is collected by the Ohio Dept. of Taxation (via your employer) and sent to the school district quarterly. The tax always becomes effective on January 1st. The first payment will be received by the school district in April of that year (school districts can count on that payment being relatively small). Districts will receive four payments per calendar year: one in January, April, July, and October. Each payment will be for the amount collected during the prior quarter. It will take approximately one and a half years (six quarters) for districts to receive the full amount of taxes liable from the first year it is levied because of how the tax is collected. Employer withholding comes in throughout the year, but individual annual returns are not due until the following calendar year.

Detailed Question

How does the school receive the School District Income Tax money?

How does the school district earned income tax affect farmers?

This would generally benefit farmers who bear a large share of the property tax burden in many rural school districts. Unlike a property tax, a tax on earned income is reduced when farm profits fall. Payments for the earned income tax may also be spread throughout the year by making estimated payments or possibly through withholding from farm income, as opposed to the property tax which is payable twice a year.

Detailed Question

How does the school district earned income tax affect farmers?